Skin & Bones

MAKE THE CONNECTION

Some things just go together. Like milk and cookies—the connection is obvious. But your skin and bones also have much more in common than you might think. If you have psoriasis or a family history of it, there’s a chance your joints may be affected at some point. Here’s how to make the connection to psoriatic arthritis sooner, rather than later.

ARE YOU AT RISK?

You may not realize it, but stiffness and pain in certain joints, tendons or ligaments might not be a passing thing, especially if psoriasis is involved. They could be early signs of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a form of arthritis that, like psoriasis, is part of a family of conditions called psoriatic disease.

WHAT IS PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS?

~30%

of people with psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis.

1 out of 3

people with psoriasis has a family member with the condition.

KNOW THE RISK FACTORS FOR PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS,
AND WATCH FOR THE SYMPTOMS

If you’re living with the red, scaly patches of psoriasis, you should also be alert to the potential development of psoriatic arthritis, even if you aren’t currently feeling symptoms in your joints. It can take many years for psoriatic arthritis to appear, which is why it’s so important to know your risk and to consider more than just your skin.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SYMPTOMS AND RISK FACTORS OF PSA

WHAT IS AN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE?

Both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are autoimmune conditions. This means they’re caused by the body’s own immune system automatically reacting as though it is fighting a foreign infection, even when there isn’t one.

What causes psoriatic arthritis?

DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE

Unfortunately, there is no test or clear-cut method for diagnosing psoriatic arthritis. To diagnose the condition, a dermatologist or rheumatologist often has to make the connection themselves, putting together many different pieces of a puzzle.

What can I do?